8.19.2013

Conflicted. What would you have done?

Here's the scenario inspired by yet another post on a local forum.

A boy and his father are fishing at a local forest preserve lake. The boy catches a bass around 12 inches and wants to take it home to show his mom. The size limit for bass on that lake is 14 inches - everything under that must be released according to the rules. A good samaritan sees this bass go into a bag and promptly/politely confronts the father and boy. He informs them that it is illegal to keep that fish and if they do not release it, he will call the DNR to report them. They comply and release the fish.

Now, I can definitely understand and appreciate the good samiritan's actions. I think that making sure rules are enforced is a duty of all fisherman to protect our resources. But with that, I wonder if it always has to be so black and white or if there is a gray area. I don't know anything about the boy's age or the relationship that he has with his mother but I can't help but think back to when I was a kid. I used to be so excited to show my mom the fish I caught. Making her proud was something that I always used to strive for and felt so good when I did. I would have been heartbroken is somebody did anything to stop that from happening so I can't help but wonder how upset this made the boy. I wonder if he is now jaded from the sport because of this.

What's your take? What would you have done?

11 comments:

  1. My mother would have been relieved someone stopped me from bringing her a fish. Chances are s is not going to be eaten or mounted on the wall. I remember a stranger asking me to release a large crappie I caught in a pond near my house when I took it up to the playground to show the kids there. That was one of my first lessons in being a respectful outdoorsman.

    ReplyDelete
  2. That's a tough call. My sentimental side says let the kid have the fish , but realistically if we bend the rules for one person it can cause problems.

    It's a shame the kid's dad didn't take a few minutes to read up on the rules. I'm a firm believer that if you're teaching a kid to fish , teaching them about the conservation end of fisheries management is a must.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I would have voiced the rules and explained the reason for the size limits, but would have told them i would let it slide this time. We need more people in the sport to have a stronger voice.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I don't condone keeping the fish and I believe that's a real teachable moment for to help the kid understand the sacrifice that goes along with conservation. But it's on dad to do the right thing here - as an outside party, I'd stay out of it. It's collateral damage and to me, it's the acceptable form vs. some dingleberry just trying to fill a stringer. That, I have no problem putting a stop to.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Well, in my humble opinion, dad blew it. As Tim said, that was a teachable moment for dad to teach the kid about conservation and the importance of rules. I'm glad someone stepped up and said something. Think how many times no one does or no one is around to monitor. Pretty soon the fish are gone and no one understands why.

    ReplyDelete
  6. It's on the dad to know the regs and teach them to his son, not to mention teaching him about good sportsmanship and conservation. Being the rule-follower that I am, I would have said something. I wouldn't want the kid to get hooked on the sport and think it's okay to bend the rules at certain times. Besides, how hard is it to take a picture home for mom?

    ReplyDelete
  7. Pictures! We need to teach the next generation that it's all about catch and release, a picture can tell a thousand words.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I agree, Dad should have used a cell phone and took a picture. Teach the kids to comply with the rules right off the bat because if you get caught by the conservation officer, it's always more trouble (and money) than the fish was worth.

    ReplyDelete
  9. There must always be grey. Fishing isn't black and white; conservation doesn't always equate to C&R. We all bend the rules sometimes. It's important to see context rather than always worrying about the thin end of the wedge.

    Good Samaritans don't confront. Perhaps suggest...teach.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I understand the gray area you mention. One must, however, understand that there are rules in outdoor sports regardless of whether or not we agree with them that must be followed. It was incumbent on the parent to know the rules and laws of the body of water they were fishing, and to pass that knowledge onto the child. Take a photo to show the mother. If it was legal, then by all means take the fish - but it was not.

    ReplyDelete
  11. What's the point? SO many bucketheads at the preserve lakes in a few years there will be nothing but panfish. Hell maybe even those will be gone. I've seen people taking those home to eat. It's just dumb and ignorant that these people ruin it for everyone else. Regulations are for everyone... included kids.

    ReplyDelete

Let's hear it!

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Search This Blog